“Braking it down Barney Style”



Here is some basic industry vocabulary for you to familiarize yourself with, Enjoy !

Alcohol Extraction —  This method uses alcohol (preferably pure ethyl alcohol, but also isopropyl) as a solvent to strip cannabis of its trichomes and essential oils. After washing the plant material, the remaining alcohol is evaporated off, leaving behind a golden hash oil. Further processing via heat, agitation, or vacuum pressure will aid in removing any residual alcohol from the oil, which is essential prior to smoking, as well as result in different textures (shatter, budder, or oil).

Blunt — A hollowed-out cigar which is then rerolled with weed; the name originally came about because the most used brand of cigars were Phillies Blunt. Due to OLCC regulations dispensaries cannot sell tobacco products, so our blunts are rolled with hemp.

Budder — Another term for the opaque form of hash oil. The difference between wax and budder is subtle, but generally, budder is a softer, pliable product (like softened butter at room temperature) while wax trends more towards the crumbly side.

Buds — The dried flowers of the cannabis plant. Ideally, buds should be well-trimmed, dry enough so that the stems snap, and cured for a couple of weeks prior to being smoked.

Budtender — Like a bartender (or a pharmacist), except for weed. This is the person who works the counter, whose job it is to offer suggestions, answer questions and showcase our products to customers.

Cannabidiol (CBD) — Gaining popularity as the primary therapeutic cannabinoid for a variety of diseases, specifically autism as well as epilepsy and other nerve-related conditions, cannabidiol is generally the second-most common cannabinoid found in cannabis, after THC.

Cannabinoid (CBC, CBCV, CBD, CBDA, CBDV, CBG, CBGV, CBL, CBN, CBV, THC, THCA, THCV) — The chemical compounds found within the cannabis plant, cannabinoids come in both psychoactive and non-psychoactive varieties, but all of them act upon the human body’s built-in cannabinoid receptors.

Cartridge— Cartridges, or Carts, are small attachments to a cannabis e-cigarette or vape pen. They are sold pre-filled with cannabis concentrates which are rich in cannabis’ medicinal active ingredients.

Clone — A clipping from a cannabis plant, which can then be rooted and grown.

Closed-loop Extraction — Chemical extraction (whether using a hydrocarbon solvent or CO2) using a closed system, which means that the machine recycles the solvent rather than dispersing it in the air. Most commonly this is referring to a butane or propane extraction, but technically CO2 extraction machines are also closed-loop systems.

CO2 extraction — When high pressure is applied to CO2, it becomes a liquid that can work as a solvent, stripping away cannabinoids and essential oils from plant material. This process is called supercritical extraction and is the most common method of making hash oil using CO2 instead of a hydrocarbon solvent such as butane.

Concentrate — The word “concentrate” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something cleaner and more potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency.

Cone — The European style of joint, which is slightly conical rather than straight, getting wider towards the end. Most cones also include a rolled paper “crutch”, which works to keep the weed from falling out the small end, but also helps aerate the joint so the resin does not cake the end shut.

Cure — The curing process is an important step in a well-grown cannabis plant’s life cycle. After being harvested, trimmed, and sufficiently dried, the plant’s flowers are then put into airtight containers which slows the drying, allowing for a more measured and gradual process, which helps to maximize the flavor and smoke quality. Like what you would see with cigars or even wine, the drying and aging process develops deeper flavors and mellows the smoke. Uncured or improperly cured flowers often taste and smell like hay, burn badly, and are harsh on the throat.

Dab — The act of “dabbing” concentrates onto a hot surface, producing a vapor. Can also be used as a noun, meaning a small amount of concentrate (a dab’s worth).

Decarboxylate — The process of converting the acid form (also called “inactive”) cannabinoids such as THCA and CBDA is an essential part of the process if you wish to consume cannabis orally — or experience the psychoactive properties of THC in smoked or vaporized flower or concentrates. Decarboxylation occurs at around 240 degrees Fahrenheit, converting THCA and CBDA into THC and CBD, respectively. Though the acid forms of these cannabinoids have some medicinal benefits, normally decarboxylation is desired for maximum potency and effect in edibles, tinctures, and salves. Otherwise, load up a bowl or roll a joint with dried flower and light it up to decarb the traditional way.

Dry sieve hash (sometimes “dry sift”) — A mechanical separation process which generally uses a variety of screens and agitation to separate the trichomes from the plant material, dry sieve hash is also traditionally known as kief.

Edibles — Any cannabis product which is consumed orally and digested is considered an edible. Whether it is the stereotypical “pot brownie” or one of the sophisticated orally active cannabis capsules, edibles are often recommended as the best choice for those who want to enjoy the benefits of cannabis without having to smoke anything. Cannabis consumed orally is quite a bit stronger and lasts longer, so it is always best to consume a little bit at a time to allow the full effects to develop.

Flower — Rather than calling them “buds,” many modern cannabis aficionados refer to the female plant’s racemes (that is the official horticulture term) as flowers.

Hash — Traditionally “hashish” refers to any collection of the resin glands (trichomes) of the cannabis plant. Collection of the trichomes is performed via a variety of methods (dry sieve, water extraction), and the resulting product can be pressed, sieved, or micro-planed into different consistencies depending upon the desired use and smoking method.

Hydrocarbon Extractions — Any extraction process that uses hydrocarbons such as butane, propane, pentane, or hexane.

Indica — Though recent plant taxonomy studies have mostly determined that cannabis does not actually have two distinct species in indica and sativa, these classifications are still used in the culture to help describe the differences between plants while they are growing, as well as the effect they provide. Though there are some exceptions to the rule, indica varieties are shorter plants which mature more quickly, they also provide a relaxing, sedative effect. Indica varieties are most often used for relieving pain, muscle tension, insomnia, anxiety, lack of appetite, as well as easing spasms and reducing inflammation.

Live Resin — A relatively new extraction process of closed-loop butane extraction systems. Instead of using dry plant material as is the norm for BHO extractions, the live resin process used fresh frozen plants, which were harvested only hours earlier; this creates a product which has the terpene profile of the live plant rather than the dried flowers (terpenes degrade and change as the plant is dried).

NUG Run — Hash oil or water hash made entirely from cannabis flowers rather than trim material. Since the flowers are the most trichome and terpene-rich part of the cannabis plant, these extracts are known for yielding quite a bit more than trim as well as providing a cleaner flavor.

Oil — Refers to any hash oil, whether it is extracted via hydrocarbon, alcohol, or CO2.

Phenotype — A technical term from genetics and horticulture, phenotype means “genetic expression.” Each cannabis strain has two parent plants: one male and one female. When the female is pollinated by the male and produces seeds, those seeds contain the genetic material of both parents and (much like animal breeding) the resulting plants have only that genetic material with which to work. Excusing genetic mutations, a hybrid of two stable strains would product three distinct phenotypes: phenotype A, which leans more towards the mother; phenotype B, which leans more towards the father; and phenotype C, which is a blend of the two. Growers will then select their favorite choices from the phenotypes displayed, choosing plants based on a variety of qualities including appearance, aroma, taste, effect, flowering time, and stature. Phenotype is often shortened to simply “pheno.”

Pre-roll — A pre-rolled joint that is supplied by a dispensary.

Pressed Hash — After extraction, hash (normally water extracted, but also dry sieve) can be pressed using pressure and sometimes heat. If using heat, this process can activate the hash partially, but the primary purpose of this is to make it denser and create an outer shell which keeps the inside terpene-rich and fresh for over a year.

Pull ‘N Snap — The texture of hash oil at which lies between a runnier oil and the shelf stable shatter at room temperature, a proper pull and snap is easily gripped by the dabber but pulls slightly before snapping off. The ambient temperature plays a huge part in oil’s texture, as more heat will make it runnier and sappier while cold will make it shatter.

Sap — When hash oil is stringy and sappy rather than brittle like Shatter.

Sativa — Sativa varieties originate mostly in the equatorial areas of the world and are known for their uplifting, heady effects. The plants grow very tall and take a long time to mature, but the resulting yields are normally far greater than traditional indica plants. Sativas are best known for treating depression, fatigue, and promoting creativity and sociability; they can also mitigate the effects of glaucoma and certain nerve conditions, though their effects can vary from user to user. Caution is generally advised for those who suffer from anxiety and fibromyalgia, as these conditions can often be aggravated by racy sativa.

Shatter (see also: butane hash oil)— Shatter is a texture of hash oil and refers to the transparent, shelf-stable oil which breaks into pieces rather than bending. The most popular choices of butane concentrate on the market are either shatter or wax, which are on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to texture.

Solventless wax — Solventless wax (or sometimes solventless oil) refers to the highest grade of water hash, which looks and smokes like solvent-based hashes and is capable of being dabbed.

Terpene — The aromatic and flavor compounds found within cannabis (and nearly every other plant on the planet), terpenes are responsible for the veritable rainbow of cannabis strains, which all exhibit subtle differences in smell and flavor. Terpenes are volatile and evaporate at low temperatures, so when storing or extracting cannabis, it is best to keep everything very cold. Terpenes also have medical benefits in themselves, as evidenced by the aromatherapy industry… this means that some of those super flavorful plants that seem to get you higher than the bland ones do because they have a stronger or more rounded effects package.

THC — Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant and is responsible for most of the plant’s psychoactive properties. THC has lots of medical benefits including analgesic properties, though perhaps its most defined quality is its tendency to increase appetite.

Tincture — A liquid extraction of cannabis, often made with alcohol or glycerin, using methods that date back thousands of years. Tinctures are often administered sublingually (or under the tongue) to help with quick absorption, offering a similar high to edibles without having to swallow food for those with little appetite. Glycerin tinctures are sweeter, with almost a syrup-like texture, while alcohol tinctures have some serious burn, as they are often made with high-proof alcohol like.

Topicals — Topicals are external applications of cannabis that can be used to treat body pain or skin conditions, infused with THC and other cannabinoids. These can include lotions, creams, balms — pretty much anything you can rub on your skin. They generally do not give you any kind of head or body high, so they are a favorite of patients that become disoriented when inhaling or otherwise ingesting weed.

Trichome — Holding most of the cannabinoid content in the plant, the trichomes are crystalline structures which coat the plant’s bract and leaf surfaces. Looking much like a mushroom when magnified, the head contains most of the cannabinoid content and essential oils, but the stalk also has some value; the heads are what is broken off and collected in high-grade dry sieve and water hashes, while the entire trichome is dissolved in solvent-based extracts. There are three distinct types of trichomes on the plant: bulbous trichomes are the smallest and not visible to the naked eye, the sessile trichomes are slender and have no head, while the glandular trichomes are the ones that are most often seen and provide the highest number of cannabinoids.

Vape pen — A small, portable vaporizer that uses either pre-filled concentrate cartridges or has a chamber to load your own concentrates.

Wax — The opaque, crumbly texture seen in hash oil, generally after being whipped over heat to introduce air into the product.

vocabulary that you should familiarize yourself

Alcohol Extraction —  This method uses alcohol (preferably pure ethyl alcohol, but also isopropyl) as a solvent to strip cannabis of its trichomes and essential oils. After washing the plant material, the remaining alcohol is evaporated off, leaving behind a golden hash oil. Further processing via heat, agitation, or vacuum pressure will aid in removing any residual alcohol from the oil, which is essential prior to smoking, as well as result in different textures (shatter, budder, or oil).

Blunt — A hollowed-out cigar which is then rerolled with weed; the name originally came about because the most used brand of cigars were Phillies Blunt. Due to OLCC regulations dispensaries cannot sell tobacco products, so our blunts are rolled with hemp.

Budder — Another term for the opaque form of hash oil. The difference between wax and budder is subtle, but generally, budder is a softer, pliable product (like softened butter at room temperature) while wax trends more towards the crumbly side.

Buds — The dried flowers of the cannabis plant. Ideally, buds should be well-trimmed, dry enough so that the stems snap, and cured for a couple of weeks prior to being smoked.

Budtender — Like a bartender (or a pharmacist), except for weed. This is the person who works the counter, whose job it is to offer suggestions, answer questions and showcase our products to customers.

Cannabidiol (CBD) — Gaining popularity as the primary therapeutic cannabinoid for a variety of diseases, specifically autism as well as epilepsy and other nerve-related conditions, cannabidiol is generally the second-most common cannabinoid found in cannabis, after THC.

Cannabinoid (CBC, CBCV, CBD, CBDA, CBDV, CBG, CBGV, CBL, CBN, CBV, THC, THCA, THCV) — The chemical compounds found within the cannabis plant, cannabinoids come in both psychoactive and non-psychoactive varieties, but all of them act upon the human body’s built-in cannabinoid receptors.

Cartridge— Cartridges, or Carts, are small attachments to a cannabis e-cigarette or vape pen. They are sold pre-filled with cannabis concentrates which are rich in cannabis’ medicinal active ingredients.

Clone — A clipping from a cannabis plant, which can then be rooted and grown.

Closed-loop Extraction — Chemical extraction (whether using a hydrocarbon solvent or CO2) using a closed system, which means that the machine recycles the solvent rather than dispersing it in the air. Most commonly this is referring to a butane or propane extraction, but technically CO2 extraction machines are also closed-loop systems.

CO2 extraction — When high pressure is applied to CO2, it becomes a liquid that can work as a solvent, stripping away cannabinoids and essential oils from plant material. This process is called supercritical extraction and is the most common method of making hash oil using CO2 instead of a hydrocarbon solvent such as butane.

Concentrate — The word “concentrate” in the cannabis world refers to any product which refines flowers into something cleaner and more potent. This umbrella term includes any type of hash (water hash, pressed hash), dry sieve (kief), as well as any hash oils (BHO, CO2 oil, shatter, wax, etc.) and indicates that these products are a concentrated form of cannabis, carrying a much higher potency.

Cone — The European style of joint, which is slightly conical rather than straight, getting wider towards the end. Most cones also include a rolled paper “crutch”, which works to keep the weed from falling out the small end, but also helps aerate the joint so the resin does not cake the end shut.

Cure — The curing process is an important step in a well-grown cannabis plant’s life cycle. After being harvested, trimmed, and sufficiently dried, the plant’s flowers are then put into airtight containers which slows the drying, allowing for a more measured and gradual process, which helps to maximize the flavor and smoke quality. Like what you would see with cigars or even wine, the drying and aging process develops deeper flavors and mellows the smoke. Uncured or improperly cured flowers often taste and smell like hay, burn badly, and are harsh on the throat.

Dab — The act of “dabbing” concentrates onto a hot surface, producing a vapor. Can also be used as a noun, meaning a small amount of concentrate (a dab’s worth).

Decarboxylate — The process of converting the acid form (also called “inactive”) cannabinoids such as THCA and CBDA is an essential part of the process if you wish to consume cannabis orally — or experience the psychoactive properties of THC in smoked or vaporized flower or concentrates. Decarboxylation occurs at around 240 degrees Fahrenheit, converting THCA and CBDA into THC and CBD, respectively. Though the acid forms of these cannabinoids have some medicinal benefits, normally decarboxylation is desired for maximum potency and effect in edibles, tinctures, and salves. Otherwise, load up a bowl or roll a joint with dried flower and light it up to decarb the traditional way.

Dry sieve hash (sometimes “dry sift”) — A mechanical separation process which generally uses a variety of screens and agitation to separate the trichomes from the plant material, dry sieve hash is also traditionally known as kief.

Edibles — Any cannabis product which is consumed orally and digested is considered an edible. Whether it is the stereotypical “pot brownie” or one of the sophisticated orally active cannabis capsules, edibles are often recommended as the best choice for those who want to enjoy the benefits of cannabis without having to smoke anything. Cannabis consumed orally is quite a bit stronger and lasts longer, so it is always best to consume a little bit at a time to allow the full effects to develop.

Flower — Rather than calling them “buds,” many modern cannabis aficionados refer to the female plant’s racemes (that is the official horticulture term) as flowers.

Hash — Traditionally “hashish” refers to any collection of the resin glands (trichomes) of the cannabis plant. Collection of the trichomes is performed via a variety of methods (dry sieve, water extraction), and the resulting product can be pressed, sieved, or micro-planed into different consistencies depending upon the desired use and smoking method.

Hydrocarbon Extractions — Any extraction process that uses hydrocarbons such as butane, propane, pentane, or hexane.

Indica — Though recent plant taxonomy studies have mostly determined that cannabis does not actually have two distinct species in indica and sativa, these classifications are still used in the culture to help describe the differences between plants while they are growing, as well as the effect they provide. Though there are some exceptions to the rule, indica varieties are shorter plants which mature more quickly, they also provide a relaxing, sedative effect. Indica varieties are most often used for relieving pain, muscle tension, insomnia, anxiety, lack of appetite, as well as easing spasms and reducing inflammation.

Live Resin — A relatively new extraction process of closed-loop butane extraction systems. Instead of using dry plant material as is the norm for BHO extractions, the live resin process used fresh frozen plants, which were harvested only hours earlier; this creates a product which has the terpene profile of the live plant rather than the dried flowers (terpenes degrade and change as the plant is dried).

NUG Run — Hash oil or water hash made entirely from cannabis flowers rather than trim material. Since the flowers are the most trichome and terpene-rich part of the cannabis plant, these extracts are known for yielding quite a bit more than trim as well as providing a cleaner flavor.

Oil — Refers to any hash oil, whether it is extracted via hydrocarbon, alcohol, or CO2.

Phenotype — A technical term from genetics and horticulture, phenotype means “genetic expression.” Each cannabis strain has two parent plants: one male and one female. When the female is pollinated by the male and produces seeds, those seeds contain the genetic material of both parents and (much like animal breeding) the resulting plants have only that genetic material with which to work. Excusing genetic mutations, a hybrid of two stable strains would product three distinct phenotypes: phenotype A, which leans more towards the mother; phenotype B, which leans more towards the father; and phenotype C, which is a blend of the two. Growers will then select their favorite choices from the phenotypes displayed, choosing plants based on a variety of qualities including appearance, aroma, taste, effect, flowering time, and stature. Phenotype is often shortened to simply “pheno.”

Pre-roll — A pre-rolled joint that is supplied by a dispensary.

Pressed Hash — After extraction, hash (normally water extracted, but also dry sieve) can be pressed using pressure and sometimes heat. If using heat, this process can activate the hash partially, but the primary purpose of this is to make it denser and create an outer shell which keeps the inside terpene-rich and fresh for over a year.

Pull ‘N Snap — The texture of hash oil at which lies between a runnier oil and the shelf stable shatter at room temperature, a proper pull and snap is easily gripped by the dabber but pulls slightly before snapping off. The ambient temperature plays a huge part in oil’s texture, as more heat will make it runnier and sappier while cold will make it shatter.

Sap — When hash oil is stringy and sappy rather than brittle like Shatter.

Sativa — Sativa varieties originate mostly in the equatorial areas of the world and are known for their uplifting, heady effects. The plants grow very tall and take a long time to mature, but the resulting yields are normally far greater than traditional indica plants. Sativas are best known for treating depression, fatigue, and promoting creativity and sociability; they can also mitigate the effects of glaucoma and certain nerve conditions, though their effects can vary from user to user. Caution is generally advised for those who suffer from anxiety and fibromyalgia, as these conditions can often be aggravated by racy sativa.

Shatter (see also: butane hash oil)— Shatter is a texture of hash oil and refers to the transparent, shelf-stable oil which breaks into pieces rather than bending. The most popular choices of butane concentrate on the market are either shatter or wax, which are on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to texture.

Solventless wax — Solventless wax (or sometimes solventless oil) refers to the highest grade of water hash, which looks and smokes like solvent-based hashes and is capable of being dabbed.

Terpene — The aromatic and flavor compounds found within cannabis (and nearly every other plant on the planet), terpenes are responsible for the veritable rainbow of cannabis strains, which all exhibit subtle differences in smell and flavor. Terpenes are volatile and evaporate at low temperatures, so when storing or extracting cannabis, it is best to keep everything very cold. Terpenes also have medical benefits in themselves, as evidenced by the aromatherapy industry… this means that some of those super flavorful plants that seem to get you higher than the bland ones do because they have a stronger or more rounded effects package.

THC — Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant and is responsible for most of the plant’s psychoactive properties. THC has lots of medical benefits including analgesic properties, though perhaps its most defined quality is its tendency to increase appetite.

Tincture — A liquid extraction of cannabis, often made with alcohol or glycerin, using methods that date back thousands of years. Tinctures are often administered sublingually (or under the tongue) to help with quick absorption, offering a similar high to edibles without having to swallow food for those with little appetite. Glycerin tinctures are sweeter, with almost a syrup-like texture, while alcohol tinctures have some serious burn, as they are often made with high-proof alcohol like.

Topicals — Topicals are external applications of cannabis that can be used to treat body pain or skin conditions, infused with THC and other cannabinoids. These can include lotions, creams, balms — pretty much anything you can rub on your skin. They generally do not give you any kind of head or body high, so they are a favorite of patients that become disoriented when inhaling or otherwise ingesting weed.

Trichome — Holding most of the cannabinoid content in the plant, the trichomes are crystalline structures which coat the plant’s bract and leaf surfaces. Looking much like a mushroom when magnified, the head contains most of the cannabinoid content and essential oils, but the stalk also has some value; the heads are what is broken off and collected in high-grade dry sieve and water hashes, while the entire trichome is dissolved in solvent-based extracts. There are three distinct types of trichomes on the plant: bulbous trichomes are the smallest and not visible to the naked eye, the sessile trichomes are slender and have no head, while the glandular trichomes are the ones that are most often seen and provide the highest number of cannabinoids.

Vape pen — A small, portable vaporizer that uses either pre-filled concentrate cartridges or has a chamber to load your own concentrates.

Wax — The opaque, crumbly texture seen in hash oil, generally after being whipped over heat to introduce air into the product.